Decorating Bushes with Christmas Lights

Christmas lights bushesDuring the Christmas season, the common sight of twinkling lights can brighten our short days and beautify the drab winter landscape. These days, we have more options than ever, as net lighting and LED lights have grown in popularity.

As lovely as they are, holiday lights can be a bit of a task to string up, especially if it’s your first time! If you would rather let a professional handle this job- or any other landscaping that needs doing, click here for a free estimate from JC’s Landscaping, LLC!

But if you’ve decided to take on this project, yourself, here is some handy advice on how to decorate your bushes.

Have A Plan In Mind

It is important that you measure bushes and the shrubs, including the width and the height, to determine the number of strings you need. Start by taking a few photographs of your yard, to identify which bushes will get a Christmas makeover. Having pictures and measurements with you will help you make an informed decision while choosing your lights at the store.

One way to simplify things a bit while optimizing the aesthetics is to focus on the bushes at the perimeters of your yard, and then choosing a shrub toward the middle as your “centerpiece.” That way, your display will look balanced, without taking on the chore of adorning every bush in the yard.

Buy The Correct Lights

The best Christmas lights to guarantee maximum illumination are net lights and mini-light strings. These types are perfect for use on bushes and shrubs. If you’re decorating a large bush, using the larger globe lights can create a more dramatic display.

String Lights

When working with string lighting, the ‘S’ or Zigzag pattern is the best way to lay them along your bushes. Reference your pictures and measurements to determine how many you’ll need, and be sure you’ve arranged them such that the connectors are easy to find.

The lights should be nestled far enough into the bushes so that they lie comfortably on their branches. However, be sure you do not push so far back that they get tangled, or can’t be seen clearly.

For thicker bushes, especially evergreens that may retain dense foliage throughout the winter, you may want to double the amount of lights you use. Decorating one side at a time with 2 separate strands will guarantee brighter, more thorough light coverage.

Net Lighting

If you’ve chosen net lighting, the process is a bit different. This style of lights simply needs to be laid over the top of the bush, but it still requires some forethought. For optimal coverage,make sure you’re place the netting evenly, and pull a few branches through to hold the net in place.

In the interest of safety, keep in mind that you shouldn’t install more than 1,400 Watts on a single circuit. Check your packaging and do the math before plugging everything in! Additionally, green extension cords and power stakes will blend into the yard more easily.

Frame The Bushes

For an attractive finish that you can actually leave up all year, you might consider adding some ground lights along the base of your shrubs. Lantern lights come in a variety of styles and sizes, and are quite easy to install. Whether you wish to highlight your Christmas decor, or simply frame your landscaping, ground lights are a simple yet attractive addition to your yard. 

Wrapping It Up

The great thing about decorating your bushes with Christmas lights, instead of your home or your trees, is that it is easier both to put up and take down. No nails, hooks, or fasteners of any other sort are necessary to keep them in place. Keep them neatly sorted when you take them down for storage, so you’ll be a step ahead for next season!

If you’re wanting a beautifully lit yard this season, but simply don’t have the time to do it yourself, visit our Christmas Light Setup: Installation and Removal page, to find out how we can help.

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